August 20, 2015

A Big Breath of Beautiful

Posted in Uncategorized at 12:45 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

The news, my Facebook and Twitter feeds, even the people I talk to, all demonstrate and discuss what is wrong with the world. Change won’t occur if people are unaware of the problems, the disasters, and the corruption in the world. We need to know. We need to know, so we can work to make the world better. But from time to time, we all need a big breath of beautiful.

Follow Kate DiCamillo on Facebook. Kate posts infrequently, but every post is like a soul cleansing shower. She notices the beauty in the world and shares it in words witty and wise.

If you know of other short bits of shared beauty like Kate’s posts, please mention them in the comments below.

Fairy Tales
I’ve always enjoyed escaping to a fantasy world where good behavior is rewarded and bad behavior punished. I prefer the stories in which it is mildly punished, and the perpetrators forgiven and allowed a reformed life. Revenge is dirt on the soul. So, I find many of the original tales too dark. I love the modern re-tellings and fairy tales. Here are a few I’ve read recently and enjoyed:

Gail Carson Levine’s Ella Enchanted

Wendy Mass’ Twice Told Tales

Marissa Meyers’ The Lunar Chronicles

Anne Ursu’s The Real Boy

Kate di Camillo’s A Tale of Despereaux

Laura Amy Schlitz’ Splendors and Glooms

Maggie Stiefvater’s The Scorpio Races

Gregory Maguire’s Egg and Spoon

L. Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz and all his Oz books

The evil in the world can seem overwhelming. We can feel utterly powerless when confronted with it. This is why I write. In my head and on the computer screen, I create a world of problems. Then I solve them. I give my characters resolution and happy endings.

The problems of the world will find you. You don’t have to look.

Happiness can seem elusive and fragile, but it exists and it is strong. You must go looking for it. Your soul-cleansing places may be different than mine. Seek them out. And when you find them,

take a Big Breath of Beautiful

July 17, 2015

Two Great Books for You to Read!

Posted in books, reading tagged at 3:04 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

Within the last two weeks, I read two books about Christian missionaries traveling to alien worlds. I recommend them both. Both are works of fantasy, yet both are grounded in reality, providing wonderful character studies and handling deep philosophical questions.

book of strange new thingsIn The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber, Peter, an English pastor, is chosen by a powerful multi-national corporation to act as a missionary to the Oasans, people on a planet newly colonized by earth. Peter must leave his beloved wife, Bea, and their cat, Jacob. Bea introduced Peter to Christianity and their marriage has been one of deep love and total companionship. The difficulty of their separation and what it does to their relationship is one of the main focuses of the novel. The “aliens” that Peter ministers to are thirsty for knowledge of Christ, and we wonder why. We also wonder about the powerful muti-national corporation and its motivation for sending Peter. And what about the previous pastor who disappeared? And the linguist who taught the natives English and also disappeared? While the novel is suspenseful, it isn’t action-packed. The stress on Peter and Bea’s relationship also causes stress on their faith, and this is where the book excels. Its examination of love and faith in crisis is fascinating.

The Sparrow bookThe Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell is also an examination of faith. Father Emilio Sandoz had it and lost it: why? Father Emilio Sandoz is one of a crew of Jesuit missionaries sent toward Alpha Centauri after radio signals demonstrate that intelligent life exists on a planet in that area of space. Sandoz is the only survivor of the mission. The book alternates between “past” and “present.” In present day, Sandoz is being interrogated by the Jesuits to discover what went wrong. He is accused of some horrible crimes. In alternate chapters, we learn about the discovery of the radio signals, the recruitment of the crew (all wonderful characters, that we readers fall in love with; Sandoz being the most wonderful), the trip across space, until the past meets up with Sandoz’s confessions. What went wrong? How did everyone die? How did Sandoz “go bad” ? This book has action, great characterization, and incredible world building. The author, Mary Doria Russell, has a PhD in biological anthropology, and uses her knowledge well. The development of the setting on the new planet–the cultures and languages and interactions of the races–is brilliant and probably my favorite part of the book.

I was disappointed by the endings of both books. However….

After thinking about the ending of The Book of Strange New Things for several days, I changed my mind. It ends exactly how it should. I didn’t “get” it at first, but I do now.

The Sparrow puts so much emphasis on what went wrong, what horrible thing happened, that its discovery was anti-climactic for me. I still recommend the book.

I highly recommend both books. So, get reading!

June 5, 2015

Pitch Contests

Posted in Uncategorized at 4:05 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

The Writer’s Voice/Pitch Wars competition featured many talented writers with intriguing concepts. I did not make a team, but I wish good luck to those who did and to their coaches. You can follow the competition at Brenda Drake’s blog.

Many conversations about the contest were on twitter, and I didn’t want to miss out, so I set up a twitter account:

@elizabethcfelt

Follow me if you do that sort of thing.

New to twitter, I did a lot of lurking so as not to mess up or offend anyone (sorry if I have!)

Immediately, I learned about #PitMad, a day in which writers pitch their completed novels in 140 characters, all day long.  Wow! I should have gotten on twitter a long time ago!

I participated in #PitMad and had some success getting noticed. I’ll be sending out queries over the next few days.

So, though I “lost” on Writer’s Voice, I’m still a winner!

May 21, 2015

Writer’s Voice Contestant

Posted in books, Cinderella, steampunk, Writer's Voice at 11:25 am by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

QUERY:

Dear Krista, Brenda, Mónica, and Elizabeth,

Ever wonder why Cinderella’s stepsisters were so mean? They’ve been misunderstood. THE STEPSISTERS is a young adult, steampunk Cinderella told in alternating first person by the stepsisters. It is complete at 55,000 words.

Drusilla “Dru” is a mildly autistic, scientifically-minded teen who doesn’t use pronouns. When her father dies, she vows to complete all his laboratory plans and projects. Dru’s younger sister Charlotte “Lottie” is a social fashionista who grieves the death of her father and the loss of the family fortune. Their mother re-marries to save the family from poverty, and they move to a two-room farmhouse where their stepsister Cyntia Rellah runs a messenger pigeon service.

The Rellah farm is near the country palace of the King and Queen, who are expecting a child. For centuries the Royalty of Jacobia have been born with weak hearts because of an ancient curse. A special medicine is no longer available, so the King brings Dru to the royal laboratory to finish her father’s work: discover a new medicine or create a mechanical heart for an infant. As the day of birth draws near, Dru must complete the invention her father began or else the child won’t survive.

Impressed by Lottie’s sense of fashion and magical aura, the Queen entangles her in a quest to find and kill the descendant of the sorceress who placed the curse. Lottie must choose between saving her family or serving the Queen.

The traditional Cinderella tropes are used and transformed in this tale of magic, science and romance.

I teach children’s literature at the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point. My adult historical novel, SYNCOPATION: A MEMOIR OF ADELE HUGO was published by Cornerstone Press in 2012. My middle-grade mystery, THE STOLEN GOLDIN VIOLIN, was self-published in 2010. I am a member of SCBWI, AWP and the Historical Novels Society.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

FIRST 250 WORDS:

The gondola of the luxury airship Ludtwidge sways gently beneath its hydrogen-filled webwrought balloon. Pilot Brijit Eyre studies the darkness out the bridge window and taps the barometer. Something’s off. She can feel it in the air, in her bones.

“Betti, change course 5 degrees north-northwest. Alec, get a mech-pigeon ready.”

Captain Eyre flips a valve. Steam hisses through a pipe, moving the engine to full throttle.

The Ludtwidge uses a Steppe steam engine. Instead of creating steam by burning coal or gas, Steppe engines use the flameless heat of firestones. A vast improvement over past airship engines. Flame and hydrogen are a deadly combination.

In the largest cabin of the Ludtwidge, inventor Sir Ernest Steppe lies on his bunk, melting into sleep.

His daughter Dru holds her hat, which begins to fly. She yells at Ernest. No, it isn’t Dru. It’s the Queen. She’s angry at Ernest. He hasn’t done what he should’ve done. Is it about Dru’s engagement to the Prince? He dreads explaining the situation to his wife. The Queen expands to twice her size. Her red hair ignites into flames. She leans over—

Ernest wakes when his body hits the floor. The airship’s gondola rocks. The floor tilts. He slides from one side of the cabin to the other.

Ernest grabs the porthole’s raised edges and pulls himself up. Rain pelts the glass. Lighting flickers in the distance. Thunder rumbles.

“Heavens undone.”

Ernest puts on his shoes and heads to the engine room.

April 2, 2015

Septimus Heap and International Children’s Book Day

Posted in author, books, reading at 12:01 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

Me reading to my boys (a few years ago)

Me reading to my boys (who no longer fit on my lap)

When my boys were little, we did a lot of reading aloud, including Angie Sage’s Septimus Heap books, a 7-book, middle-grade fantasy series about the seventh son of a seventh son. We read books 1-3, then got book 4 when it came out. By the time book 5 came out, we were reading them on our own, and I had forgotten so much about the earlier books, that I didn’t know what was going on all the time. I decided I’d wait for books 6 and 7 to come out and then start at the beginning again.

And then the years went by and I forgot….

Until I found book 7 in a store two weeks ago and re-started the series. Wow! It is even better than I remembered. Angie Sage’s world building is fabulous. She has many, many characters and they are well developed and interesting. The plot moves like an out-of-control roller coaster. The writing is clever and funny.

But the best thing. The most notable thing about this series: The number of female characters. The number of female characters either matches or is greater than the number of male characters. The female characters have important roles too.

The first in the series

The first in the series

This kingdom is a matriarchy, with power passing from Queen to Princess. Ten-year-old Princess Jenna is a main character, as “main” as the title character of Septimus. There are male and female wizards, but the top wizard, the Extra-Ordinary Wizard, is a woman. There is a coven of witches (all female) and a female boat builder. A series about a boy named Septimus Heap, who is the seventh son of a seventh son, is going to have a lot of boys in it. And it does. But not more boys than girls.

It is so rare to find as many female characters as male characters in a fantasy novel that this book seems female-heavy. Yet, when you sit down and count, the numbers of male and female characters are even. Just like real life.

Is this important? I think so.

Harry Potter has Hermione and Professor McGonagall and Bellatrix, but each of them stands in the shadow of a more important male character: Harry, Dumbledore, Voldemort. All the key characters are male.

I don’t blame JK Rowling. Would her books have gotten the same attention if Harry had been Henrietta, the girl who lived? I doubt it.

Angie Sage's Septimus Heap series (I must have loaned out book 2)

Angie Sage’s Septimus Heap series (I must have loaned out book 2)

So, please, on this International Children’s Book Day, buy (or borrow) the Septimus Heap series (Magyk, Flyte, Physik, Queste, Syren, Darke, and Fyre) and read them to your favorite children.

You will be struck by the number of female characters. But guess what? Your children won’t.

March 14, 2015

Pi Day

Posted in Uncategorized tagged at 3:33 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

two piesTo celebrate Pi Day, I’ve written a poem about pie, using pi. I’m not much of a poet, as you will see, but it is fun to do something a little different. Each line of my poem has the number of words for the first nine digits of pi:

3.14159365

There they lie.

Pies

blueberry and chocolate hazelnut

forbidden

baked for an adult gathering

a dinner party to which I was not invited

two pies

not for me but eaten by me

and well worth the punishment

March 6, 2015

Rain Reign and Crossover

Posted in books, poetry, reading at 11:57 am by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

For the past several years, my ladies book club has decide to spend the months of December and January reading children’s novels that have a chance at the Newbery Medal. We do a bit of research, come up with about 15 to 20 titles, then share the books. We meet in January and talk about our favorites. The Newbery Medal is  announced at the end of January.

RainReignThis year, the book I liked most was Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin. The story is about an autistic girl and her dog. It is a beautiful, beautiful book.  I was extremely disappointed when the Newbery Medal was awarded to Kwame Alexander’s Crossover, a book I hadn’t even heard of.

crossoverWell, I just finished reading Crossover, and I am delighted that it won the award. It is a wonderful novel-in-verse about two African American brothers who love basketball.  I’m not male, I’m not African American, and I don’t much like basketball.  It doesn’t matter! The story is brilliant and the writing inspired. Alexander’s poetry jumps off the page and sings in your head.  Some poetry you have to read aloud to hear it as poetry, but I could hear the cadence and the rhymes in my head even in silent reading.

Crossover is not only a book for people who love to read, it is a book that will appeal to those who hardly ever read.  So, hats off to Kwame Alexander and the Newbery Award committee. Great book. Great choice.

February 27, 2015

Reading Challenge 2015: Update #1

Posted in author, books, reading at 11:04 am by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

A Facebook friend of mine is doing a reading challenge, and I agreed to do it with her. I’m not sure where she found the list, but I printed it (when I decided to do the challenge) and through a google search (just now) found an online copy on the blog of children’s author Julie Stroebel Barichello.

Two months into the year and I’ve read eighteen books. Here’s how they fit into some of the challenge categories:
A book with more than 500 pages: One Summer by Bill Bryson
A book published this year: The Eterna Files by Leanna Renee Hieber
A book with a number in the title: Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary
A book with nonhuman characters: The Mouse with the Question Mark Tail by Richard Peck
A book by a female author: Absolutely Almost by Lisa Graff
A book with a one-word title: Firegirl by Tony Abbott
A book set in a different country: The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper
A book by an author you love that you have not read yet: The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis
A book a friend recommended: Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor
A book more than 100 years old: Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
A book from your childhood: Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
A book set in the future: The Ear, the Eye and the Arm by Nancy Farmer
A book that made you cry: Feathers by Jacqueline Woodson
A book with magic: First Frost by Sarah Addison Allen
A book by an author you’ve never read before: As Love Blooms by Lorna Seilstad

As the year progresses, I’ll match more books with more categories and post updates here. It isn’t too late to join the challenge!

January 27, 2015

A New Semester of Children’s Literature

Posted in Uncategorized at 12:15 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

I’m back for another semester of Children’s Literature. This is what my students will be reading:

Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson. I teach this every semester. It is a great book.

Choice books. My students will read one from each genre:

Historical Fiction

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell: In the early 1800s a Native American girl and her brother struggle to survive when left behind on an island off the coast of California.

Sarah Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan: Two children living on the prairie in nineteenth century America anticipate a new mother when their father begins corresponding with a woman from Maine.

Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse: A collection of free-verse poems describe a young girl during the Great Depression struggling with poverty, dust, guilt and loss.

Contemporary Realistic Fiction

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen: A boy, the lone survivor of a plane crash, struggles to survive in the Canadian wilderness.

My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George: A boy leaves his over-crowded New York apartment to spend a winter, alone, in the Catskill Mountains.

Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary: With creativity and humor, Ramona deals with a babysitter, a bully, and a dad who is going back to school.

Feathers by Jacqueline Woodson: After reading a poem and thinking about hope, a sixth-grade girl examines anew the world around her: her brother’s deafness, her mother’s fears, her friends’ faith, as well as a school bully and his victim.

Fantasy

The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner: In an imaginary medieval land, a thief is released from prison on the condition that he find, for the king, a legendary jewel hidden in a maze beneath a river.

The Ear, the Eye, the Arm by Nancy Farmer: In 2213 Mozambique, three siblings leave their protected home, are kidnapped, and have a series of dangerous adventures.

The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper: On his eleventh birthday, Will learns he is an immortal Old One, and the only one who can find the six signs that will turn back the rising of the dark forces in the world.

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White: The classic story of friendship between a pig and a spider.

Mixed Genre

Holes by Louis Sachar: In the past, a man is cursed and a teacher becomes an outlaw. In the present, a boy struggles to survive a juvenile detention center in the desert.

Kneeknock Rise by Natalie Babbitt: In a medieval-like land, a boy visits his relatives in a town that is famous for the monster than lives on its mountain.

Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo: A girl, whose mother left her and her father, moves and makes friends with the help of a dog.

They’ll read two other choice books, based on an author and a theme. It is my first time using some of the books listed above. I’m excited for discussions, activities, and to see what my students think of the different books. We’re off to another great semester!

January 20, 2015

David’s Birthday

Posted in Uncategorized at 3:59 pm by elizabethcaulfieldfelt

david reading

David reading to his grandson.

david

Today is my older brother’s birthday. David would have been 51. He died on January 10, 2015. From his obituary:

David Richard Caulfield, 50, of Bloomington, died Saturday while out for a run. He was an avid runner and tri-athlete, an Indiana University alumnus and sports fan, and an aficionado of Marvel comics. A history enthusiast, David was following his long-time dream of earning a PhD. He was a graduate student and had an assistantship with Indiana University’s School of Education. David always made sure the people closest to him felt loved. He will be sorely missed by many. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Caulfield Funeral / Education Fund at http://www.gofundme.com/k123l8

David and I did not agree on very many things and we didn’t always get along, but his death has left a hole in my life and sadness in my heart. His life ended much too early. I hope he is finding peace and happiness in his new adventure.

david siblings

Happy Birthday, David.

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